QUICK SHEETS


ALABAMA

- 37 Human Trafficking cases reported in Alabama to the National Hotline in 2014 (Info From National Human Trafficking Resource Center http://www.traffickingresourcecenter.org/states operated by Polaris Project)

- Alabama has had a human trafficking law since 2010. 
Legislation provides that it would be unlawful for a person, by coercion or deception, to cause another person to work or perform services having financial value or require that person to perform certain sexual activities; provides penalties; provides exemptions to a corporation if the corporation was not aware of the actions of its agents or employees. (info from National Conference of State Legislatures http://www.ncsl.org/research/civil-and-criminal-justice/human-trafficking-laws-in-the-states-updated-nov.aspx )

- A Safe Harbor Act will be introduced during the upcoming 2015 legislative session by Representative Jack Williams (R-Vestavia Hills) to ensure that children caught up in human trafficking are recognized as victims not criminals.  (info from Alabama Human Trafficking Task Force www.enditalabama.org )

The State of Alabama earned a C in the 2014 Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. Click here to view the report cards. According to the 2014 report, “Alabama’s human trafficking law requires the use of coercion or deception to cause a minor to engage in commercial sex acts. Demand is largely unaddressed in the law, leaving buyers undeterred. Sex trafficking victims seeking justice are not protected by a “rape shield” law or courtroom protections and are not assured non-punitive response and treatment.“ The National Human Trafficking Resource Center, which mans the 24-hour human trafficking hotline, receives phone calls from Alabama. In 2013, NHTRC identified 44 potential human trafficking victims out of the 176 calls made. Out of the 169 calls from Alabama in 2014, 37 potential human trafficking cases were identified. For a breakdown of the 24-hour hotline statistics on Alabama please Click here.


LOUISIANA

- In 2011, the State of Louisiana adapted the U.S. definition of trafficking making it a criminal offense.

"to knowingly recruit, harbor, transport, provide, solicit, obtain, or maintain the use of another person through fraud, force, or coercion to provide services or labor” (RS 14:46.2)".

"to knowingly recruit, harbor, transport, provide, solicit, obtain, or maintain the use of another person under the age of 18 years for the purpose of engaging in commercial sexual activity” (RS 14:46.3)."

-  Louisiana has some of the toughest human trafficking laws in the country, earning an A in the 2014 Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. (Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. 2014. “2014 State Report Cards”.)
Click here to view online.

- As awareness increases, so do calls to the National Human Trafficking Hotline. In 2013, they received 443 calls from Louisiana, of which 69 potential human trafficking victims were identified. A significant increase from 223 calls in the previous year, of which 31 were identified as potential victims. (National Human Trafficking Resource Center (NHTRC). 2012 and 2012. “Louisiana State Report 2012” and “…2013”). 

- Hope House U.S. provided care for trafficked women since its opening on October 1, 2013; and it is the only safe-house available in Louisiana designated specifically for human trafficking victims.

- Human vulnerability in Louisiana continues to be a factor in trafficking due to the state’s demographics (Loyola University Modern Slavery Research Project (MSRP). 2014. “The Louisiana Human Trafficking Report”.) Click here to view online.

The state has some of the toughest human trafficking laws in the country, earning an A in the 2014 Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. Click here to view the report cards. According to the 2014 report, “Louisiana’s criminal laws make the actions of traffickers, buyers and facilitators subject to serious penalties, including substantial financial penalties.” However, “Victims of domestic minor sex trafficking have access to specialized services and housing but are not immune and face possible arrest and detention for prostitution offenses committed as a result of their exploitation.” The National Human Trafficking Resource Center, which mans the 24-hour human trafficking hotline, continues to get phone calls from Louisiana. In 2013, they received 443 calls of which 69 potential human trafficking victims were identified. In 2014, 96 out of the 417 calls from Louisiana were potential human trafficking cases. For a breakdown of the 24-hour hotline statistics for Louisiana please Click here.


TEXAS

The State of Texas earned a B in the 2014 Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. Click here to view the report cards. According to the 2014 report, “Texas has a full range of criminal laws against domestic minor sex trafficking; however, minors are not statutorily immune from prosecution for prostitution and may face barriers to treatment and victims’ compensation to fund their recovery.” The National Human Trafficking Resource Center, which mans the 24-hour human trafficking hotline, receives a high volume of calls from Texas. In 2013, NHTRC identified 431 potential human trafficking victims out of the 1,888 calls made. Out of the 1,876 calls in 2014, 452 potential human trafficking cases were identified. For a breakdown of the 24-hour hotline statistics on Texas please Click here.


WASHINGTON

The State of Washington earned an A in the 2014 Shared Hope International Protected Innocence Challenge. Click here to view the report cards. According to the 2014 report, “The human trafficking law [in Washington] does not require proof of force, fraud, or coercion when the victim is a minor....” However, “Domestic minor sex trafficking victims are not immune from prosecution for prostitution and could face detention as a juvenile offender.” The National Human Trafficking Resource Center, which mans the 24-hour human trafficking hotline, receives calls from Washington. In 2013, 130 potential human trafficking victims were identified out of the 551 calls made. Out of the 500 calls made in 2014, 122 potential human trafficking cases were identified. For a breakdown of the 24-hour hotline statistics on Washington please Click here.


NATIONAL

According to the 2015 TIP Report, the United States is still a source, destination, and transit country for human trafficking. “Particularly vulnerable populations in the United States include: children in the child welfare and juvenile justice systems; runaway and homeless youth; children working in agriculture; American Indians and Alaska Natives; migrant laborers; foreign national domestic workers in diplomatic households; employees of businesses in ethnic communities; populations with limited English proficiency; persons with disabilities; rural populations; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals.” The precise number of victims is difficult to measure because there are still local and state officials failing to identify a trafficking victim.